You Have My Heart

“I got this tattoo a couple days before my wedding. My boyfriend, at the time, wrote me a hand-written note on our anniversary that said, ‘You have my heart.’ The first time he ever saw this tattoo was when I met him at the alter. The look on his face will never leave my mind.”

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Apologue #48: The Red String of Fate

Ever hear about the red string of fate? It’s all about love. The red string of fate, also referred to as the red thread of destiny, red thread of fate, and other variants, is an East Asian belief originating from Chinese legend and is also known to be used in Japanese legends, as well. According to the myth, the gods tied an invisible red string around the ankles of men and women who are destined to be soul-mates and will one day marry each other. Often, in Japanese culture, it is thought to be tied on the pinky finger.

The two people connected by the red thread are destined lovers — regardless of time, place or circumstances. The magical string may stretch or tangle, but can never break. The myth is similar to the Western concept of soul-mates or a destined flame.

There are many folklore tales such as these in other foreign cultures that I have heard about. I remember one Greek legend about how humans used to two beings born to be stuck together by the hip, until the gods split everyone up into single beings, and so we search wholeheartedly of our other “missing” half/twin. The concept of soul-mates through legends that transverse through time and in different cultures are always so captivating to hear about and learn.

We all know that these legends have been romanticized dramatically to aspire young people about love, but I’ve always had a heart for them and will always lend an ear to hear more. Believing in destiny has become a young person’s game but it never hurts to dream every once in a while under a blue moon.

Pianist Bride

I’m not a professional pianist, far from it actually — but the piano has always been a great part of my life. It surely is a heartfelt hobby and I try to practice every day so I’ll never forget anything that I’ve taught myself. I first learned how to play when I was four years old, so you can just imagine how much the piano means to me.

Anyways, I found this gorgeous bridal picture whilst surfing the net of wedding photos and fell in love with this one. It’s absolutely vintage and adoring. I can’t stop staring at it with my mouth open. This is must-do whenever I get my bridal pictures done. Classy and romantic! A true romantist’s style in achieving the perfect look. Don’t you think?

Titanic’s Isidor and Ida Straus

I’m sure everyone has seen the movie, “Titanic” at least a good dozen times in their lifetime. If the history behind the tragedy didn’t get your fancy, we all knew that our heartthrob sensation of Leo DiCaprio was good eye candy during the film. Before the sinking of the ship, there are two scenes that have always captured my heart and has made me cry so many tears. The first scene is where the string quartet stays behind to perform their hymn till their last breath, and the second scene is of the elderly couple that hold tight to each other on their deathbed as the ocean waters slowly start filling up their room.

It so happens though, that these two were supposedly based on a real couple, who said they wouldn’t board a lifeboat as long as there were younger people still aboard the ship.

Meet Isidor and Ida Straus. Records state that the couple had been married for 41 years at the time of the disaster. They raised six children together, and were almost inseparable. On the rare occasion that they were apart, they wrote to each other every day.

During the sinking, Titanic’s officers and other first class members pleaded with the 63 year old Ida to board a lifeboat and escape the disaster, but she repeatedly refused to leave her husband behind. Although Isidor was offered a seat in a lifeboat to accompany Ida, he strongly refused whilst there were still women and children on board.

Ida then, placed her newly hired maid (Ellen Bird) in a lifeboat, taking her fur coat off and and handing it to the maid to shield her from the cold noting that she no longer needed it. Ida is reported to have said, “I will not be separated from my husband. As we have lived, so will we die, together.” When last seen by witnesses, the couple were standing on deck, holding each other in a tight embrace accepting their fates together.

Isidor’s body was recovered but the funeral service was delayed for a few days in hopes that Ida’s body may too, be recovered, allowing the two who had lived and died together to also share a funeral — but sadly, Ida’s body was never found. Several days later, their funeral drew some 20,000 mourners at Carnegie Hall. A monument to them still stands at Woodlawn Cemetery in the Bronx, with the inscription from Song of Solomon 8:7 that quotes: “Many waters cannot quench love — neither can the floods drown it.”

i carry your heart with me (i carry it in)

i carry your heart with me (i carry it in
my heart) i am never without it (anywhere
i go you go, my dear; and whatever is done
by only me is your doing, my darling)

                                            i fear
no fate (for you are my fate, my sweet) i want
no world (for beautiful you are my world, my true)
and it’s you are whatever a moon has always meant
and whatever a sun will always sing is you

here is the deepest secret nobody knows
(here is the root of the root and the bud of the bud
and the sky of the sky of a tree called life; which grows
higher than soul can hope or mind can hide)
and this is the wonder that’s keeping the stars apart

i carry your heart (i carry it in my heart)

e.e. cummings